8 Types of Diphthongs Sounds and Examples

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8 Types of Diphthongs Sounds and Examples! A diphthong is a type of vowel sound that is produced when two vowels are pronounced consecutively. The first vowel is much stronger than the second, and the two merge to form one sound. There are eight different types of diphthongs in English, and each has its own unique pronunciation. In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at each of these sounds, with examples for each.

A diphthong is a vowel sound that is made up of two vowel sounds, usually represented by two letters. In English, there are eight diphthongs: /ei/, /ɪu/, /aʊ/, /ɔɪ/, /ʊə/, /eə/, /ɪə/, and /ʊə/.

Diphthongs are typically formed when two adjacent vowels are pronounced together in quick succession. For example, the word “boat” is pronounced with a diphthong, as the /o/ and /a/ sounds are blended together to form the /oʊ/ sound. While diphthongs are not particularly common in other languages, they play an important role in English pronunciation.

As a result, it is important for English learners to be familiar with them. In this blog post, we will take a closer look at each of the eight diphthongs and provide examples for each.

Types of Diphthongs

8 Types of Diphthongs

1- /ei/ Diphthong

The /ei/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /e/ and /i/. This diphthong is typically found in words of French origin, such as “deity” and “vein”. It can also be found in words of Greek origin, such as “phonics” and “chiropractor”. The /ei/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Latin, such as “Reid” and “weird”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /ei/ diphthong:

“eight”, “they”, ” weight”, “neighbour”, and “stein”.

2- /ɪu/ Diphthong

The /ɪu/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /ɪ/ and /u/. This diphthong is found in a variety of words, including many that are of French origin, such as “suitor” and “fruit”. It can also be found in words of Latin origin, such as “delirium” and “orbital”. The /ɪu/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Greek, such as “museum” and “symposium”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /ɪu/ diphthong:

“suit”, “fruit”, “fluid”, “ruin”, and “build”.

3- /aʊ/ Diphthong

The /aʊ/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /a/ and /ʊ/. This diphthong is found in a variety of words, including many that are of Anglo-Saxon origin, such as “mouth” and “house”. It can also be found in words of Latin origin, such as “noun” and “fraud”. The /aʊ/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Greek, such as “sauce” and “causal”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /aʊ/ diphthong:

“south”, “mouth”, “hound”, “OUNCE”, and “bounce”.

4- /ɔɪ/ Diphthong

The /ɔɪ/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /ɔ/ and /i/. This diphthong is found in a variety of words, including many that are of Anglo-Saxon origin, such as “boy” and “toy”. It can also be found in words of Latin origin, such as “annoy” and “royal”. The /ɔɪ/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Greek, such as “oil” and “spoil”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /ɔɪ/ diphthong:

“soy”, “joy”, “noise”, “point”, and “coin”.

5- /ʊə/ Diphthong

The /ʊə/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /ʊ/ and /ə/. This diphthong is found in a variety of words, including many that are of Anglo-Saxon origin, such as “sure” and “cure”. It can also be found in words of Latin origin, such as “inure” and “mature”. The /ʊə/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Greek, such as “tour” and “sculpture”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /ʊə/ diphthong:

“pure”, “cure”, “moor”, “poor”, and “flour”.

6- /eə/ Diphthong

The /eə/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /e/ and /ə/. This diphthong is found in a variety of words, including many that are of Anglo-Saxon origin, such as “bear” and “care”. It can also be found in words of Latin origin, such as “fear” and “rear”. The /eə/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Greek, such as “hare” and “stare”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /eə/ diphthong:

“where”, “there”, “wear”, “tear”, and “pear”.

7- /ɪə/ Diphthong

The /ɪə/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /ɪ/ and /ə/. This diphthong is found in a variety of words, including many that are of Anglo-Saxon origin, such as “beer” and “cheer”. It can also be found in words of Latin origin, such as “deer” and “sheer”. The /ɪə/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Greek, such as “fiend” and “clearing”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /ɪə/ diphthong:

“near”, “ear”, “here”, “seriously”, and “fierce”.

8- /ʊə/ Diphthong

The /ʊə/ diphthong is made up of the vowel sounds /ʊ/ and /ə/. This diphthong is found in a variety of words, including many that are of Anglo-Saxon origin, such as “poor” and “door”. It can also be found in words of Latin origin, such as “floor” and “more”. The /ʊə/ diphthong is also common in words that are derived from Greek, such as “myrrh” and “borough”.

Here are some other examples of words that contain the /ʊə/ diphthong:

“tour”, “museum”, “resume”, and “parachute”.

Categories of Diphthong

Diphthongs are classified by linguists into several categories in order to classify their many sounds.

  1. Falling diphthongs
  2. Rising diphthong.
  3. Closing diphthongs
  4. Narrow diphthongs
  5. Wide diphthongs

1- Falling diphthongs

A falling diphthong is a diphthong in which the vowel sound starts out as a relatively high vowel (such as /i/ or /u/) and then “falls” to a lower vowel sound (such as /a/). The word “cow” is an example of a falling diphthong since it starts with the /k/ sound, followed by the /aʊ/ diphthong.

2- Rising diphthongs

A rising diphthong is a diphthong in which the vowel sound starts out as a relatively low vowel (such as /a/) and then “rises” to a higher vowel sound (such as /i/). The word “house” is an example of a rising diphthong since it starts with the /h/ sound, followed by the /aʊ/ diphthong.

3- Closing diphthongs

A closing diphthong is a diphthong in which the vowel sound starts out as a relatively high vowel (such as /i/) and then “closes” to a lower vowel sound (such as /u/). The word “book” is an example of a closing diphthong since it starts with the /b/ sound, followed by the /ʊk/ diphthong.

4- Narrow diphthongs

A narrow diphthong is a diphthong in which the two vowel sounds are relatively close to each other in terms of vowel height. The word “buy” is an example of a narrow diphthong since it starts with the /b/ sound, followed by the /aɪ/ diphthong.

5- Wide diphthongs

A wide diphthong is a diphthong in which the two vowel sounds are relatively far from each other in terms of vowel height. The word “boy” is an example of a wide diphthong since it starts with the /b/ sound, followed by the /ɔɪ/ diphthong.

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